CARS HOMES JOBS

Comments by yuton


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Posted on February 21 at 4:18 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Having photographed shows for many years, and learned how in large part from watching Marty Benjamin do it, I want to chime in here. Marty's observation about Humperdinck's management barring photos once the artist started to sweat highlighted a common attitude: Managers and publicists want their artists shown as fresh, vital, vigorous and not disheveled. However, I recall that Metallica took the opposite approach when they played the RPI Fieldhouse years ago: they barred photography until the encore - a completely different image or value proposition. Those shots showed exhilarated, weary, wet and wild young guys. By that stage of the show, those guys looked like they'd been rocking in a car wash.


From: Singers see photography issue as a matter of control


Posted on December 6 at 4:16 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Some suggestions:
1. No "pavers"! They inevitably break, becoming ugly and dangerous while requiring expensive, time-consuming and inconvenient repairs. Station police in all public meetings about traffic and roadway matters, to arrest anyone who suggests pavers for any project, anywhere.
2. No roundabout! Whatever gains in efficiency can be claimed for them are erased by increased crashes. Adding constriction and lane changes to an already congested situation is asking for trouble.
3. Congestion on Erie Blvd. is very time-specific and preventable simply by staggering work-shift times at GE. Erie works fine except when too many drivers try to use it at the same time.


From: Officials eye options for Erie Blvd.-Nott St. intersection


Posted on February 28 at 3:39 p.m. (Suggest removal)

This is bogus; a power play which, if executed, would threaten the programming at one of the area's finest performing arts venues.
OGS has steadily degraded the quality of free music programming at the Empire State Plaza, so Kidera's claims of success ring hollow. Granted, this is likely a funding issue, but it is still a drop in perceived value and proof OGS lacks expertise in presenting quality programming.
Kidera's criticisms of the Egg Board are superficial and don't address results at all, but instead focus on process, and this discussion should be about results. He also overlooks the strength of the Egg's membership base whose financial support helps leverage down the ticket prices for events that cost ticket-buyers more when presented elsewhere. That membership base and its money will vanish in the wind if this takeover occurs, and this in turn would inevitability erode the quality of programming.
This proposed takeover is a terribly bad idea.


From: State board calls for shifting control of Egg to OGS


Posted on January 7 at 4:21 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Thanks for posting better photos than ran in the print edition Sunday


From: Home-brewing beer is catching on


Posted on April 25 at 4:08 p.m. (Suggest removal)

This would set a record for short-sightedness: Doesn't the word "floodplain:" mean anything?


From: Second hotel planned on Mohawk River


Posted on January 17 at 4:50 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Interestingly enough, Sara, both Prince and Bjork are at the top of my bucket list, too. Al Green was at the top of my list for several years, but then I saw him at SPAC's Jazz Fest... and I wished I hadn't.


From: Band bucket list


Posted on October 21 at 9:58 p.m. (Suggest removal)

To wmarincic: I believe you do not understand what the meanings of the 1% and the 99% are. The 1% are the ultra rich who are at the top of the "income" earners in the US. (Much of that income is not "earned" in the sense most people associate with the term "earned."It comes from investment income which is not a paycheck, as well as money from various other sources not associated with a paycheck.) The rest of the US is the 99%. Average teacher salary for NYS is $57,000. That includes New York City which is much higher than the rest of the state. That salary is not part of the 1%. In addition teachers do pay a portion of their healthcare costs, which varies by district. Also if she is a newer teacher she pays 3.5% of her salary towards pension for as long as he or she is teaching. A teacher who is a little older paid 3% of their salary for 10 years of service and only then does not pay. You may not like public employees so just say so, don't make things up!!!


From: A diverse crowd 'occupying' Albany (with video)


Posted on January 20 at 3:05 p.m. (Suggest removal)

SUNY "leaders" are seriously misguided in their attempts to convert the system into low-brow techie trade-schools for training uneducated industrial dociles; bored button-pushers. This idiotic go-fight-it-out strategy would predictably emphasize geographic advantages and ultimately destroy remote campuses and the small towns that depend on them. Instead, state "government" should re-institute a stock-transfer tax, attrit staff deadwood, get solvent and face its responsibilities.


From: Should SUNY colleges and universities be competing for state funding?


Posted on June 15 at 10:02 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Don, you have made even terrible commutes at least bearable and often hilarious. It was like having an old friend in the passenger seat, a friend whose fertile mind contained an entire repertory company of characters and craziness, but also appreciation for all that's fine and strange here. Adios


From: Don Weeks, WGY's morning voice, to retire


Posted on March 25 at 1:26 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Dan was a fountain of fresh and stimulating thought and is not replaceable.
I admired him as a colleague, valued him as a friend and relied on him, always, for a view of the world that was warmly compassionate, intellectually rigorous and entirely his own.
Michael Hochanadel, Gazette freelance music writer


From: Gazette, CBS 6 film critic Dan DiNicola dies


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