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Comments by MikeJSilvestri


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Posted on November 2 at 1:37 p.m. (Suggest removal)

The Campaign For Fiscal Equity was successful and resulted in the Contract For Excellence in 2007. But that increased funding was then lost to The Gap Elimination Adjustment.
Former Gov. David Paterson introduced the GEA in 2010. It was supposed to be a temporary solution to closing the state's $10 billion budget deficit. It essentially spreads out some of the state's fiscal shortfall among all school districts by reducing the amount of Foundation Aid the state is supposed to pay the districts. So schools actually get funding on one budget line and then have it deducted on a subsequent GEA line. The GEA is much more detrimental to poorer districts whose budgets are based on a higher percentage of state funding. Schenectady's school budget shortfall has usually been almost exactly equal to its share of GEA.
While the CFE, passed by the legislature in reaction to the ruling, did help poor school districts it did so by increasing funding for all districts instead of moving funding from richer (mostly downstate) districts to poorer (mostly upstate and western NY) districts.


From: Spring: State aid is discriminatory


Posted on October 31 at 8:01 p.m. (Suggest removal)

The response is that as reflective professionals educators were doing their best for their students and they use d what they have learned in order to improve their practice and are continuing to do so.


From: Feds: Blacks, Hispanics treated differently


Posted on October 31 at 5:35 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Because I was waiting on this to best provide clarity http://www.schenectady.k12.ny.us/News/20...
It paints a very different picture...


From: Feds: Blacks, Hispanics treated differently


Posted on October 29 at 3:31 p.m. (Suggest removal)

I did not bash private schools I only pointed out that you can not compare a school that takes all students to one that gets to pick and choose its student body. Imagine two ballplayers in a HR Derby where one must swing at all 10 pitches thrown but the other gets to swing at only the 10 pitches they like and can let the others go by with no penalty.
I am sorry for my confusion that you were looking at state numbers, your use of 57% a former Schenectady graduation rate led me to believe that that was what you were looking at. If we are going to discuss statewide salaries we really need to take into account the divergent cost of living throughout the state.
Once again though you have stated incorrect facts the average graduation rate in this state for public schools is 74% (meaning the student must have graduated in 4 years)the total graduation rate for public schools is 81% when time limit is not taken into account.
http://www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/pressReleas..., Graduation Rates: Students Who Started 9th Grade in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008


From: Education won’t improve until teachers get more respect


Posted on October 28 at 7:50 p.m. (Suggest removal)

You stated "60k a year with summers plus a couple weeks around Christmas and every major holiday off after around 5 years is not bad pay." Therefore based on your criteria we should not be including the summer because according to you that salary was attained without working in the summer. So if we deduct the roughly $4,500 I made in the summer I still fall below your 60K threshold in my ninth year that you state teachers are making around the 5th year. So again based on your criteria you do not have the correct numbers.
I never stated that the 65% graduation rate was commendable I only stated that it was not the 57% you stated, so again you did not have the correct numbers.
You are using average pay for those in the TRS but have no ability to come up with what the average teacher makes because it includes as you stated TAs who make less but also Principals who make more. But even if you have that average salary it would not equate to what a 5 year teacher makes because the average teacher has more than 5 years experience.
I did not address your NYSUT statement because I have no idea what billions you are talking about.


From: Education won’t improve until teachers get more respect


Posted on October 28 at 10:38 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Yes by working all summer teaching summer school and working on curriculum and attending PD during the summer and after school.


From: Education won’t improve until teachers get more respect


Posted on October 27 at 6:22 p.m. (Suggest removal)

wmarincic you are correct no teacher should be complaining if they are making 60K around their 5th year. It is the fact that are making less than 50K in their 5th year and do not see 60K till their 11th that leads to complaints.

You have a right to your uninformed opinions regarding the graduation rates of private schools, who can throw out a student who is not meeting certain academic requirements and send them back to the public schools to deal with. But you do not have a right to your own facts about salaries especially when these facts have been pointed out to you before.

Another fact I am sure you will choose to go ignore in future posts because it does not fit your narrative is that the SCSD graduation rate has been steadily increasing and stands at 65%.


From: Education won’t improve until teachers get more respect


Posted on October 25 at 12:05 p.m. (Suggest removal)

For the most part although kinks need to be worked, out teachers do not reject the higher standards included in the common core. What teachers reject is having high stakes testing for students and ourselves before we can truly design the curriculum to match those higher standards. All teachers for the most part want is just the time that the other 42 out of 44 states, who implemented the standards, are allowing.


From: Common Core blasted at forum


Posted on October 25 at 6:58 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Commissioner King can prove that the common core is not about tests and truly allow districts to have control over the curriculum by agreeing to a moratorium on high stakes common core exams. By doing so New York would join the other 42 of 44 states implementing the standards but not testing them yet.


From: Common Core blasted at forum


Posted on April 26 at 8:37 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Districts agreed to these deals because the State has not completed its part, figuring out how State tests scores will be calculated into the 40% of teahcer evals, so no one knows how these scores will turn out. That is how it continues...


From: District’s teacher evaluation plan draws rebuke


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