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June 15, 2009 Poll Results

Are you in favor of an expanded bottle-deposit law in New York that could include deposits on water bottles, juices and sport drinks?

No, keep things the way they are 39% 420 votes
Yes, there should be deposits on those drinks (as there are on alcoholic and carbonated beverages) to help reduce the impact on the environment 60% 646 votes
Total: 1066 Votes

Note: This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

comments

Artrina
June 15, 2009
4:44 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

I see more water bottles on the ground than I do soda and beer bottles. If a deposit will solve that problem, then I'm all for it.

annarondac
June 15, 2009
5:06 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

It's the problem of the State of New York. New York wanted to collect fees for the state's general fund so specially marked bottles would have to be made for only bottles sold in the state. This created a mess for the bottle companies. It's not about recycling or giving us a greener earth, it's about collecting money. No longer is New York the Empire State.

gonnamakeit
June 16, 2009
1:15 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Just keep raising prices during a recession...

gonnamakeit
June 16, 2009
1:17 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

you go annarondac

Tommy
June 16, 2009
3:57 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Why don't they call it what is? Just another tax.

Wanna cut down on litter? Require a deposit on MacDonald's cups, and bags.

gonnamakeit
June 17, 2009
10:28 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Thank you!!!! - Tommy.

tc
June 17, 2009
12:37 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

It's all consistent with the ever expanding lack of responsibility mentality sweeping the country. "Why should I throw that bottle away, someone will do it for me" "Why should I pay my mortgage?" Sad to say it's not going to change for the better anytime soon. People want assistance from cradle to grave...

schdygrl
June 17, 2009
12:45 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

I have an idea they missed. They need to give a 1099 tax form showing earned income for the people collecting the bottles. These people will then be forced to become tax payers. Imagine the extra revenue for NYS!

CapHwys
June 17, 2009
7:07 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

For those of you who say it is another tax. You're wrong!
It's a deposit. You get the money back when you recycle the container.
You already do that for soda and beer, so then you just save more bottles.
You only lose the money if you don't recycle the bottle and just throw it away.
Get your facts straight before you make an opinion!

teltech54
June 17, 2009
8:38 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

I'm all for the expanded bottle bill. Since I do not buy anything with a nickle deposit on it I don't care in that respect. But I will always pick up a bottle I can return for a free nickle. You can make decent pocket change on the soda cans now. I can probably buy a new car on the new bottle bill.

Tommy
June 17, 2009
9:59 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

CapHwys:

"For those of you who say it is another tax. You're wrong!
It's a deposit. You get the money back when you recycle the container.
You already do that for soda and beer, so then you just save more bottles.
You only lose the money if you don't recycle the bottle and just throw it away.
Get your facts straight before you make an opinion!"
==================================
Thank you for explaining what a deposit is to me.

Now that we've lifted THAT little shroud of mystery, let me state my position.

I've seen plenty of deposit laws come and go in my lifetime, and every time one is expanded, prices go up, and not just by the amount of the deposit.

Stores have to create more space to store the returnables, forcing them to either stock less goods, or build an addition, and add more labor, all of which effects their bottom lines, and ultimately, their prices.

I was reycling long before it was the "cause dejour".

I was at the very first Earth Day celebration in NYC, in 1971, and I don't think I should have to post bond on everything I buy, just to guarantee I'll dispose of it properly.

Hey why don't we expand it even more, to include fast food items, newspapers, chewing gum, electronics, candy wrappers, cigarette butts, and sneakers?

These are all items that are improperly disposed of on a regular basis.

I dispose of my stuff properly, and have no desire to store refuse in my home, just because the state is hoping that I don't actually return it, so that they can collect.

For that matter, I should be collecting interest on the deposit money, MY money, because you know, sure as you're born, that SOMEBODY is.

CapHwys
June 17, 2009
10:35 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

An imperfect world means imperfect solutions.
Every solution comes at a price.
No matter what we do, we will never have an answer that will make everyone happy.
Sure, we wouldn't need these deposit laws if everyone actually cared and picked up after themselves. Litter bugs are about the lowest you can get.
But this isn't a utopia.

ChuckT
June 18, 2009
6:58 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Sure fire way to drive more business out if the state , there are enormous costs involved for a manufacturer to market and distribute a national product that needs to have a bar code that is state exclusive. I say no, you see someone throw out trash on the street ,report them for littering....

wmarincic
June 18, 2009
10:21 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

It does not matter in Schenectady that you litter or if you let your dog crap on someones sidewalk in front of their house like happened to me yesterday. The do nothing mayor could care less about quality of life issues in Sch'dy. The Police are so short handed that they can barely cover the calls that they have let alone have an officer out for 30 minutes or more writing a citation that the liberal judge in Sch'dy will toss out anyways. It is a lose, lose situation in Sch'dy as long as Stratton and this poor excuse for a city counsel are in control.

annarondac
June 18, 2009
3:59 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

The first Earth Day was in April, 1970. I know, because I was there.

Tommy
June 18, 2009
5:50 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

As was I. So I got the date wrong. I was living down there at the time, and I still have a couple of the stickers.

martymefurst
June 21, 2009
1:09 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Tommy, a deposit on certain electronics items might not be a bad idea. Mobile phones today are for all practical purposes disposable; most people trade up to a newer one every few years, and since brand new phones can be inexpensively purchased with a service commitment there is no aftermarket to resell old phones. What you end up with is tens of millions of phones getting land filled each year, even as toxic metals inside poison the soil and water and the price of precious metals like tantalum shoot through the roof. It's not just an ecological issue, people are actually getting killed over materials used in our phones (Google the words coltan and Congo; coltan is the ore from which tantalum is derived.)

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