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Seeking answers from National Grid and PSC

Thursday, May 29, 2014
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Seeking answers from National Grid and PSC

I am writing to complain again about National Grid. I changed suppliers to save money -- but after an introductory period, the price went up. An example, March 14 to April 15 last year, my usage was 356 kwh and the total bill was $60.81. From April 15 to May 12 for 355 kwh hours, it was $62.19.

This year, with the new reduced rates with FTR supplier, after the initial introductory period, my bill for March 17 to April 15 for 320 kwh was $68.65 and for April 15 to May 16 for 317 kwh, it was down to $64.18.

I do understand it was a cold winter, but my usage was not up; in fact it was down. I watch very little TV, use cold water for my laundry and only use one lamp in the evening -- whichever room I am in.

I also understand there are people a lot worse off than I am. But why don't these executives who make the rules agree it really isn't fair to take from the low-income folks in the winter and then make them pay more in the warmer months? Seems one way or another, "executives" come out on top. And where is the Public Service Commission, which should be looking out for the "public."

I have written to the PSC twice in the past 10 years. In between two non-answers to my questions, I did receive one letter back with a "file number."

Where can an older person living with an income slightly over the "poverty line" go for help?

Patricia Bruschetti

Canajoharie

Don't see wisdom in casino gambling bid

Where is the wisdom of a gambling casino? Yes, money will come to it, but at whose expense? They would not be promoting this if there was not a lot of money to be made -- but by whom? The owners, promoters and the operators of these "establishments."

Who is hurt? Those who for the most part cannot afford the money spent on gambling. Individuals get "hooked," families get shattered; the susceptible are taught wrong values. And for what? Easy money for a very few at the expense of so many.

Is this good for our people? No. Where is the wisdom in all of this?

Elizabeth Warden

Ballston Lake

Chain bookstores no match for local store

I just read Edwin D. Reilly Jr.'s May 25 column about the potential closing of the Mohawk Commons' Barnes & Noble store, and I have to wonder, does Mr. Reilly ever go to downtown Schenectady?

Is he unaware that there is a truly local, independent bookstore that has served our community for 40-plus years?

As the daughter of the owners of The Open Door Bookstore, I have seen the constant dedication to our community. The Open Door has served readers in our area long before Barnes & Noble ever opened a store in the Capital Region and will continue to serve readers long after Barnes & Noble in Mohawk Commons closes.

This is the difference between an independent bookstore like the one Garrison Keillor opened in St. Paul (which Mr. Reilly mentions), and a corporate chain like Barnes & Noble. Local independent bookstores (and all local independent retailers, for that matter) have a vested interest in the community they serve. Chains like Barnes & Noble are beholden to their corporate bottom line.

If Mr. Reilly is truly invested in his community, he would be advocating shopping local!

Heather Hutchison

Schenectady

Government wastes taxpayers' money

I read in the paper about how the government is selling the USS Saratoga to a scrap yard in Texas for 1 cent [May 27 Gazette]. How many millions of dollars did the ship cost the taxpayers?

Also, the most waste is being spent on the people in government with all their perks and hospitalization. Laws for them and laws for us.

Wouldn't it be nice if we could switch them?

James Maxfield

Scotia

Open Door is cure for B&N's departure

I am also very saddened by the closing of the Barnes & Noble at Mohawk Commons -- especially if it is simply because DDR chose not to renew the lease for the store.

In Mr. Edwin Reilly's May 25 Viewpoint piece, he mentioned that the closing of the store will necessitate his traveling to "Albany or Wilton for the Barnes & Noble experience, or to that nice new Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga."

How unfortunate that Mr. Reilly overlooked The Open Door Bookstore on Jay Street in Schenectady! The Open Door offers a wonderful atmosphere for browsing, and if a fantastic cup of coffee is part of that Barnes & Noble experience, The Happy Cappuccino on Jay Street is just a few doors down.

I might also point out that The Open Door is open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Sundays -- which should fit his post-Mass habit nicely. He might also be able to pick up some fresh produce at the Green Market in the same trip!

Barbara Mancuso

Niskayuna

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Edition: Schenectady/Albany; Final

 

comments

May 31, 2014
8:35 a.m.
+0 votes
mezz3131 says...

A note to Elizabeth Warden, You so enjoy your very low taxes in Saratoga County, why? It might have something to do with Horse Racing. How many people have lost everything because they are addicted to the "ponies". Shut down Saratoga horse racing and Racino and see all the complaining that comes then. I'll pull up a chair to watch that show....

June 1, 2014
8:45 a.m.
+1 votes
wmarincic says...

I have a guy at my job who lost his home and family because of the horses. He lost upwards of $150,000 last year alone. Now he is living in a one bedroom dump just to keep playing those horses. Sad.

 

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