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Make post office more accessible to disabled people

Monday, June 30, 2014
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Make post office more accessible to disabled people

Regarding the Nott Street Post Office: The desk staff at this location is professional, courteous and generous with their time. So generous, that they leave their post to hold the doors for me when I exit in my power wheelchair, as there are no automatic door openers for me to operate independently.

I'm writing to ask if there is a nuance in the Americans with Disabilities Act exempting the Postal Service from having accessible facilities and if they can shed light on this deficiency. I also want to point out that as the public ages, incorporating universal design features will keep this population segment coming back as customers.

Jim O'Connor

Schenectady

Bright shirts, lights for safer bike riding

I enjoyed "Remembering Ryan 10 years later" by Matt McKibben in the June 23 Daily Gazette. The author makes some good points about bike safety. But there are some additional safety steps that all bicyclists should follow, especially if they are on a street or a highway instead of on a bike path.

Since I began following them, I have a very definite feeling that I am safer because cars are giving me a wider berth as they drive past. Bicyclists should make a point of wearing very bright-colored shirts. I am talking about the day-glow yellow and day-glow orange colored t-shirts that we all see highway crews wearing. Most drivers do not want to hit bicyclists, and they welcome the few extra seconds the early spotting of a bicyclist ahead gives them to avoid an accident. They are not expensive and even seem to be in vogue now.

Bicyclists also should make a point of using very bright flashing-white headlights and flashing red tail lights whenever they are on the road. These cost a little more than a safety yellow t-shirt, but they give motorists, especially under poor lighting conditions, more time to avoid bicyclists. They are available at any good bike store and also on the web.

I don't think wearing a good bike helmet and biking on the correct side of the road is enough on today's roads with today's distracted drivers.

David C. Furman Jr.

Niskayuna

Casino opponent off base on negatives

Robert Van Hoesen's June 23 letter repeats the stale old whining of the lollipop and unicorn crowd who are against a casino project on the former Alco site, but with a new twist, comparing it with Rotterdam Square Mall.

True, there was much worry and opposition at the time, but it was not about the possibility of business failure, as Mr. Van Hoesen suggests. Nor was it about traffic impact, which is, of course, a stock question any time there is a major undertaking.

The issue 30 years ago was the potential impact to the aquifer and wetlands, which seem to have survived just fine. He repeats the same old ideas such as using this prime waterfront property for Schenectady County Community College or manufacturing. Either of these proposals would take a huge investment of public dollars, directly or via tax breaks. He offers "what ifs."

Well, what if a business relocates after the tax incentives expire? "What ifs" be darned, the only thing for sure over the next 30 years is that there will be change. Right now, people want to invest $400 million here, and that won't cost the taxpayers a penny. If it goes broke some day, someone will build something. I don't see how we can afford to reject an investment like this.

Dan Cole Sr.

Schenectady

Writer should get facts right on guns

I feel I must respond to Barbara DeMille's erroneous statement in her June 19 editorial, "Assault weapons make killing easy."

In this article, Ms. DeMille states that Remington Arms named its Bushmaster Rifle after a deadly snake and contends that the name belies the fiction that it's meant for a day in the country at a shooting range etc. Ms. DeMille simply fabricated this false information to try to further fuel the fear and anti-gun hysteria that has swept this country in the past few years.

In truth, Remington Arms has traditionally named many of its firearms "Masters," thus denoting that they are "masters" of the use for which they are intended.

To name a few: Rangemaster Targetmaster, Scoremaster, Speedmaster to designate target rifles, Gamemaster, Woodsmaster, Fieldmaster and Bushmaster to designate hunting rifles, and Wingmaster and Brushmaster to designate hunting shotguns. To assume otherwise is absurd. Ms. DeMille's time might be better spent researching facts on gun violence in society and writing something constructive.

Ken Benson

Ballston Lake

Bad grade for Jersey Boys movie review

Re June 20 McClatchy Newspapers' article, "Down in the Valli": We were looking forward to seeing the Jersey Boys film; but after reading Roger Moore's review in the Friday Gazette, we had our doubts about going. He trashed the film, giving it a D+.

Was he ever wrong. The movie was great. The music was terrific and the period scenes put it into perspective.

Apparently, Moore was no fan of the music of the Four Seasons. He trashed not only Clint Eastwood for directing, but also nit-picked the characters and the occasional missed note.

It just goes to show you, a movie can be great in spite of someone's lousy review.

Robert Schmitz

Scotia

Price Chopper needs competitive pricing

Re June 26 article, "Price Chopper chops 80 positions," one thing they can do to keep their customers from shopping elsewhere is to do competitive pricing. They only take "coupon items" from another food chain.

If they matched the price, I believe they would get more business.

I, for one, go to Walmart because they do competitive pricing. I spend at least $100 a week and my savings are never less than $15. And as far as the gas credit goes, (10 cents when you spend $100), it is not worth it. I apply the $15 at Walmart I saved to my gas purchase. Win-win situation.

Competitive pricing would bring all my shopping back to my local Price Chopper.

C. Ann Wood

Stillwater

 

comments

July 4, 2014
5:59 a.m.
+0 votes
tonijean613 says...

Dear Ann Wood,
Your savings at Walmart are at the exploitation of their workers who work for slave wages and poor benefits. This is why their prices are lower and your "income taxes" are higher. Your income and property taxes are used to pay for welfare programs because those working at Walmart full time- still cant survive- But the owners and major stock holders earn BILLIONS per year profits. think about that. While their workers still need food stamps. So you really aren't saving anything but hurting the locals by shopping there vs Price Chopper and Hannaford who pay living wages with good benefits. Also, setting electronics aside, if you are shopping for food at Walmart and are really researching the pricing- many items are higher cost at Walmart vs
Hannaford brand My Essentials is great quality and costs less. Also, every dime you spend at the more local grocery stores (PC, Honest Weight, Niskayuna COOP, Hannaford, the Farmers markets)-
stays in the local community circulating- VS every dime you give to Walmart goes to line the pockets of the already disturbingly wealthy stock owners- Walmart never invest in their employees or the community. So if you shop there, you are reinforcing a bad business.

 

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