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Star Talk

Amateur astronomers do great job capturing the upheaval on Jupiter

This image from the Hubble Space Telescope from 2006 shows a second red spot, lower left, emerging on Jupiter.
Photographer: NASA
This image from the Hubble Space Telescope from 2006 shows a second red spot, lower left, emerging on Jupiter.
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Earlier this month, after a nine-­month stay as our evening “star,” Venus moved out of the twilight and into the dawn to become our morning “star.” You can find Venus on any clear morning if you look toward the southeast about 45 minutes before sunrise. With Venus departed from the evening sky, Jupiter is the brightest planet. Visible above the eastern horizon before sunset and by the end of civil twilight (currently around 5:30 p.m.), ...

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