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Steinmetz secretly investigated during World War I

Inventors Charles Steinmetz, right, and Thomas A. Edison are seen in Steinmetz’s Schenectady laboratory on Oct. 14, 1931. The city has a long history of innovation and technological achievements.
Inventors Charles Steinmetz, right, and Thomas A. Edison are seen in Steinmetz’s Schenectady laboratory on Oct. 14, 1931. The city has a long history of innovation and technological achievements.
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The idea really wasn’t that far-fetched, according to documentary filmmaker Bruce Carlin: Was world famous General Electric scientist Charles Steinmetz a spy for Germany during World War I? The answer is a resounding “no,” but in their upcoming film, “Divine Discontent: Charles Proteus Steinmetz,” Carlin and co-producer Paul Frederick raise that possibility after having learned the “Wizard of Schenectady” was the subject of a secret government investigation in 1917. “I think in that time period ...

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comments

mgfinch
October 24, 2013
1:15 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Of course he was investigated! At that benighted time in history, he had at least three strikes against him: he was Jewish, he was an immigrant, he was a Socialist, & his appearance was strange (Steinmetz had some type of spinal deformity). Whereas Thomas Edison was the "All-American boy!" I've read that Steinmetz was probably brighter & more innovative than Edison but was kept out of the limelight due to all the above.

wbuell
October 24, 2013
7:39 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Steinmetz wasn't kept out of the spotlight. He was world famous, nearly as much as Thomas Edison.

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