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100 at somber gathering vow to be Jack’s voice

Donald Gannon-Zebrowski reads a letter written by his son's friend Lindseay Yager during a candlelight vigil to remember his son Jack Gannon-Zebrowski, the Schalmont teen who took his own life on October 19th, at Pattersonville Fire House on Friday, November 1, 2013.
Photographer: Patrick Dodson
Donald Gannon-Zebrowski reads a letter written by his son's friend Lindseay Yager during a candlelight vigil to remember his son Jack Gannon-Zebrowski, the Schalmont teen who took his own life on October 19th, at Pattersonville Fire House on Friday, November 1, 2013.
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Jack Gannon-Zebrowski will never again light up a friend’s world with his smile, or make anyone laugh in his goofy way. But more than 100 people who turned out for a candlelight vigil in his memory Friday night at the Pattersonville Volunteer Fire Co. vowed to keep his voice alive — and to fight against a culture of bullying they say extends beyond the Schalmont Central School District. The somber crowd included as many adults ...


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comments

tonijean613
November 2, 2013
4:14 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Its so sad! sometimes I wonder if social media has made being a kid or a teen harder - but then I think back to my school days before computers and I remember the bullying. I remember being teased as the "new kid" when I changed grade schools. I remember 2 high school boys I knew fairly well who committed suicide. One was an odd outcast who I really tried to be extra nice to when I passed him in the halls bec I remember kids teasing him- and the other was a really popular kid who took his own life bec his girlfriend broke up with him. So, I think it all comes down to "sad broken hearts" and the only thing that has a chance to counter that horrible feeling is friendship, and going out of ones way to befriend a victim of bullying and to try to be there for anyone experiencing the loss of a loved one whether from a relationship heartbreak or any personal loss. Feeling accepted, supported and truly liked and part of a larger group of friends- doesn't that matter the most to everyone not just kids?.

ChuckD
November 2, 2013
4:41 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Thanks for that tonijean. I too watched a dear friend be bullied to death in high school. For me, I was like a deer in headlights as I watched him fall into a kind of psychosis in the days leading up his final act, driven, I have no doubt, by weeks of relentless bullying. And I watched, like a deer in headlights, as others brutally bullied him, not having a clue what to do since they were part of the "clique" I belonged to. His decline was so pronounced that our coach actually pulled us all aside after practice (which 'John' hadn't attended) to discuss it and assure us he was getting help, not knowing what was actually happening.
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So maybe, as I believe I heard Robin say, social media providing a kind of anonymity and awareness, might save some lives. I hope so. I'd like to think that if I'd had the awareness of what was actually happening back then and the avenue to report it anonymously, I would have also had the conscience to.

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