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Program assures welfare of farm animals

Experts believe treatment affects quality of meat

Animal Welfare Approved Program for farms-A llama named "Rua" at right, watches over and protects sheep, goats and rams, while Carol Clement finishes her daily chores in the corral at the Heather Ridge Farm in Preston Hollow owned by her and husband John Harrison.
Photographer: Marc Schultz
Animal Welfare Approved Program for farms-A llama named "Rua" at right, watches over and protects sheep, goats and rams, while Carol Clement finishes her daily chores in the corral at the Heather Ridge Farm in Preston Hollow owned by her and husband John Harrison.
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Internet sales are up at the Heather Ridge Farm in Preston Hollow, and co-owner Carol Clement believes it’s due in part to the Animal Welfare Approved label the farm earned. The certification is important for customers concerned with how well animals are treated on the farm. Clement said many of the farm’s local customers stop by and see how animals are treated for themselves — an option unavailable to those making a purchase over the ...


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comments

cmhasbrouck
March 21, 2013
12:32 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

I'm sorry, but this is the biggest bunch of hogwash I've ever read. Through the years, I have watched people try to humanize animals - television, computer games, stories, etc. and it's ridiculous There is no truth to this story. I was around farm animals from 16 years old to today (almost 40 years). I witnessed the process of feeding and caring 20 beef cows--breeding, calving, feeding and processing. There was no difference in the taste of meat from what we purchased in the store to what we raised. Our animals were born and raised on our farm, pasture fed, grained off the last six weeks and sent to a local slaughterhouse for processing. They were not coddled, nor were they abused. We were a food source to them, nothing more. My father fed them every day - morning and night year round and they showed him no more affection or interest than the first day they arrived at the farm.
This AWA certification is someone "pulling the wool" over someone's eyes. It's a way for someone to justify a business for themselves. Someone is taking advantage of the "organic" wave of advertisement going on today and trying to cash in on it.

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