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Letters to the Editor for Feb. 11

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Bravo for principled stand by Schenectady High basketball coach I read the Feb. 6 article, “Girls’ team rebuilding from scratch” with great interest and admiration. It reminded me of the movie, “Hoosiers,” in which Coach Norman Dale (played by Gene Hackman) stood up to public fan scrutiny and criticism after he removed his misbehaved “star” player from the game. He stood firm on his decision to finish the game with only four players and told ...


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comments

muggy
February 11, 2013
6:40 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Well stated, John. Raising the minimum wage hurts the very people it's intended to help. Businesses have a finite pie to expend on payroll. When a government arbitrarily raises that wage on the private sector, the decisions are set in motion to reduce the number of people taking from that pie. There's another insidious affect to raising the minimum wage. It is the toll taken on morale. Last time the minimum wage was raised, I remember a veteran paraprofessional at our school complaining that it took her years to get to the level of pay that new hires were instantly enjoying. Unemployment ALWAYS increases when the minimum wage is increased. (see http://blog.heritage.org/2011/05/16/mini...)

gina99
February 11, 2013
8:19 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Finally some truth about the job destroying minimum wage increase. New York has chased away enough business without this type of overreach. Instead of helping the working work it will throw them on unemployment. NYS is the lowest in new job creation and this will make our weak economy even worse. Stay with the national minimum wage.

cfield
February 11, 2013
9:40 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

It's so darn easy to spend everyone else's money. It's so simple why didn't I think of that!?!?!

ronzo
February 11, 2013
9:57 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Minimum Wage - Unless your comments are from personal experience that you personally started at minimum wage and advanced up the ladder, you have no idea what it is like to live and support a family earning minimum wage in a high cost of living state like New York. If not, your comments cannot be taken that seriously. But here is some personal practical experience. I managed a small business in a city where the cost of living is much lower than NY and the minimum wage is now $10.29 and soon to go to $10.51 on March 1, which is just shy of San Francisco’s $10.55 per hr. Just as a point of reference, the 1968 national minimum wage was worth over $10 per hr. in today’s dollars, so both cities are keeping pace with minimum wages and cost of living over time.

The minimum wage annual increases had minimal affect on our business. We sometimes raised our prices. So did our competitors. All hourly paid employees in the business gained because everyone’s pay got pushed up. The result is more money pumped into the local economy so more low wage people bought more goods and services from local businesses, and from national companies. The initial predictions of gloom and doom about minimum wage increases followed the same gloom and doom predictions that restaurants, bars, bowling alleys and bingo halls would go out of business when the no smoking laws went into affect. How did those gloom and doom predictions play out?

Certainly when wages go up, cost of business goes up. For everyone. You and your competitors. So which small businesses that are the low wage payers are going to leave the state first and start a business from scratch in another state? And the national companies that pay minimum wage – how many McDonald’s and Walmart stores will pack up and leave New York because of a change in minimum wage? You could be right, but history proves not.

What do you think the prevailing wage would be if there was no minimum wage law? Do you think it would even be $7.25 per hr.? How much would you pay your house cleaner, gardener, restaurant servant or day care worker?

paulj
February 11, 2013
9:58 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

I was a businessman in NY and left in 1992 because of the taxes in NY. In the 10 yr. period I left 500,000 others left also. Guess who was governor then, give up? MARIO! Sound familiar CUOMO.

paulj
February 11, 2013
11:11 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

John Hornfeck,
Ronzo

I respect those that give their names. That aside.

Will the 2 of you read Milton Friedman's books on economics.

I respect teachers John but it is obvious you don't have experience in the business world. Teaching is great, experience is more important, both make a good combination.

paulj
February 11, 2013
11:16 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

John, Hornfeck,

I'm so sorry I didn't intend to include you. Big mouth before using brain.

JIMOCONNOR
February 11, 2013
1 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Well said Boot.

ronzo
February 11, 2013
7:07 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

So muggy: the blog you point to states that “Simple economics recognizes that if the price of labor increases, employer demand for labor decreases.” So please explain why there is a salary bidding war in the I.T. and knowledge based industries because there are not enough trained people who have the skills to perform the jobs that are demanded by those industries

cracker
February 11, 2013
8:46 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

New Yorks problems have nothing to do with minimum wage. Things like the high cost of winter, too many levels of Govt, too much taxation is what has hurt this state and caused so many to move out.

ronzo
February 11, 2013
9:50 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

cracker: You are so right about the multiple levels of government and taxes in New York which are the very reasons why so many people want to leave the state. But some people who constantly complain about government via this venue are actually the ones who embrace the multiple levels of NY gov’t and really don’t care about the high taxes, because it is obvious when you read their conflicting statements about the subject. If they were really serious about what they rant about, they would do something about it. How many people who express their negative comments about government - federal, state or local would actually make the effort to try to do something about what they complain about?

catherine9966
February 12, 2013
10:59 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Re. the closing of From Here to Antiquity - it sounds like the writer feels the Gazette is to blame for this store closing??? I don't think so, as the Gazette does a lot to support its community, and it really isn't the Gazette's responsibility to promote local business for free. In order for retail to survive it needs to have a strong residential base. Downtown Schenectady does not have a residential base that can support retail other than dollar and convenience stores.

smith
February 12, 2013
11:41 a.m.

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On John O. Hornfeck: Did anyone crunch his numbers? Besides that, isn't it interesting that when sales tax goes up or assessments and taxes, when the power co. and phone co. charge a premium fee, or when NY allows the insurance co. to give stiff rate increases, there is no outcry over what the impact will be on prices and employment. But when it helps fellow human beings to hold a bit of ground against your supplier's huge increases and thus your increases--no whining heard there either--it's the end of the business world.

ronzo
February 12, 2013
7:45 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

paulj: I also respect those who give their names. That's more what the print edition is about. I also respect those who want to express their opinion via this venue without the fear of being haunted by the likes of someone like that guy Rossi(sp) Raucci(?) from the Schenectady school and get a bomb on their porch or in their car or worse.

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