The Daily Gazette
The Locally Owned Voice of the Capital Region
Advertisement
Promotions

Proctors

Review: Performers shackled by dated, offensive ‘Rat Pack’

Nigel Casey is Dean Martin and Giselle Wright is one of the Burelli Sisters in this scene from “The Rat Pack: Live at the Sands,” opening Friday at Proctors.
Nigel Casey is Dean Martin and Giselle Wright is one of the Burelli Sisters in this scene from “The Rat Pack: Live at the Sands,” opening Friday at Proctors.
  • FACEBOOK
  • TWITTER
  • GOOGLE+
  • LINKEDIN
  • PRINT
  • E-MAIL
Text Size: A | A

“Christmas with the Rat Pack” is a time capsule of a show, set in the early 1960s at the Sands Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. It features Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Dean Martin (played, respectively, by Tam Ward, Jason Pennycook and Nigel Casey) singing not only some of their greatest hits of the day, but some Christmas standards, as well. It attempts to be as true to one of their shows as ...


You Must Log-In or Subscribe to Continue Subscription Offer Individual stories can be found and purchased from our Archives for $2.00

Advertisement

comments

CarolynMB
December 22, 2013
7:28 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Carolynmb

melanie
December 22, 2013
9:10 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Dear Ms.Durant- How unfortunate you chose to articulate your comments about "how far we have come as a society .....and how you would have enjoyed it without the peek into the past". Seriously?! I was just a child when the Rat Pack was performing,but my mother enjoyed them and she was an independent,educated career woman. Do you have some illusion that our society is so much more evolved and "politically correct" than in the 1960's ? Do you read your own newspaper about all of the violence,hatred,divisive politics,racial profiling,sex trafficking etc that is going on in today's world,even in our community? Its offensive that you couldn't just review this show on its entertainment value and leave the uninformed and generation discriminatory comments out.

ednajay
December 22, 2013
10:15 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Ms Durant -- Great review overall. Well done. I'll try to get an email to you because I don't care to fully speak my mind in this very public forum. Some of the humor and attitudes of that era (which I remember well, having been born in 1944) are shockingly unacceptable today - e.g., I recently saw a 50s/60s rerun of the Jack Benny show and heard a joke at which the audience roared with laughter. But stripped of its thin veneer, it was a joke about a baby's deformity. Terrible. However, in other ways that era had far better decorum than today's anything-goes, rapidly-declining society with its obnoxious t-shirts and tv shows such as Jersey-Shore-Swamp-Ax-Dynasty.

CarolynMB
December 22, 2013
10:43 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Each generation thinks they are the cats meow. Carolynmb

JIMOCONNOR
December 22, 2013
11 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

NEW YORK, NEW YORK was written in early 70's.

jalpappas2
December 22, 2013
7:11 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

It is entertainment... Not political nonsense. My four adult children, age 27 to 32 loved it..

rschreibstein
December 23, 2013
3:09 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Amy,

Don't think for a minute that many "of the age that they would have been able to see Martin, Sinatra and Davis perform" did not join the fight against racism, sexism, anti-Semitism regardless of whether we enjoyed the Rat Pack's performances, or Jack Benny, as one other writer has admitted. We are well aware of the insensitivity and ugliness of that era and many of us fought and continue to fight that fight. I enjoy "Mad Men," and often cringe and shake my head in amazement at the dialogue. But PC language and whitewashing the era doesn't mean it didn't happen. "Rat Pack" and "Mad Men" offer an historical vignette. Be careful not to read much more into that. A performance that was historically disconnected from the era it represents would have bored me. Might as well just stay home and listen to my Sinatra collection.

Advertisement