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Building the Bombe

Long after WWII, Navy vet learns her tedious work was no ordinary job

Lessley Sanders, a WAVE in the U.S. Navy during World War II, holds a photo of her and her late husband E. Russell Sanders, who she met while serving in the Navy. Mrs. Sanders helped wire parts used on the “Bombe,” a machine that decoded secret messages.
Lessley Sanders, a WAVE in the U.S. Navy during World War II, holds a photo of her and her late husband E. Russell Sanders, who she met while serving in the Navy. Mrs. Sanders helped wire parts used on the “Bombe,” a machine that decoded secret messages.
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Lessley Sanders assembled parts for the Bombe during World War II but didn’t know it at the time. Nor did she find out until a few years ago the importance of her job as a Navy WAVE. It wasn’t the atomic bomb that some historians say brought an end to the war, yet the Bombe that Sanders constructed a part for was a crucial device nonetheless. It enabled the U.S. Navy to protect merchant ships ...


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comments

williamstatler
August 26, 2013
10:23 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Mrs. Sanders experience is just an inkling of the whole fascinating story about the British led action that broke Hitler's communication code so completely that the Allies were reading virtually all messages of the German War Machine (including those between Hitler and his commanders) before the war was over.

For MUCH more I suggest Googling and Amazoning ... "Bletchley Park" for access to many books and movies on this subject.

pbd
August 26, 2013
3:28 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

It is to this woman (and countless others of "the greatest generation") that we owe an incompensable debt of gratitude.

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