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Test scores take a dive

Officials say results reflect new standards

Rosendale Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Diane Beckert and her math students work on solving multi-step problems in December.
Rosendale Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Diane Beckert and her math students work on solving multi-step problems in December.
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School districts throughout the Capital Region saw standardized test scores in reading and math decline sharply this year for students in grades 3-8, a result state officials attributed to more rigorous academic standards and a more difficult curriculum. The plunge was observed in school districts of all types — suburban, rural and urban. Just 31.1 percent of New York students passed the state’s English Language Arts exam, while 31 percent passed the math exam, according ...

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comments

safny
August 7, 2013
12:07 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Those not so proficient students must work at your newspaper. It should be FEWER students, not less. As in - I have less money than you, and I have fewer dollar bills than you. There is less water in my glass, and there are fewer gallon jugs in my house. SHOCKING.

safny
August 7, 2013
12:53 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Thanks!!!

riverrat346531
August 8, 2013
10 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Isn't Schenectady the only school who decided they wouldn't assign homework because the kids didn't want to do it? Poverty is no excuse. I lived in extreme poverty along with extreme abuse and alcoholic parents. I decided to make something of my life and I have. And those with parents sitting home and collecting welfare should have even better grades. Their parents should always be there to ensure they are learning, otherwise they are just raising another generation of welfare recipients. They should want better for their kids and be teaching that to them. Instead their kids are running wild and making it unsafe for law abiding citizens to walk the neighborhoods. Mt Pleasant was a nice neighborhood when I was growing up and now you can't walk through there in the middle of the day.

reader1
August 8, 2013
3:05 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

riverrat - Congratulations on overcoming the odds, but, it does make a difference.

Having said that, I think we could be getting better results, economic issues notwithstanding. Too many kids are starting in Kindergarten unprepared, and more fall behind during the 1st 3 critical years.

And, the attitudes are a significant part of the problem. Education is not as valued as it should be and, in fact, in some environments is viewed with disdain.

irishlad1234
August 8, 2013
4:42 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Don't blame it on the kids, This is Common Core, a government program, should I say anything else? The same government who runs Social Security, and the US Postal service This government wants these children to learn what they want them to learn, they will all be workers just like a colony of ants! Just go to U tube and look up common core and watch it, and then go to a PTA meeting and raise hell! Let our state teach the children like it used to do! It seems teachers don't want to talk too much about common core, I wonder why. I heard they were told to keep their mouths shut. Wake up America!

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