CARS HOMES JOBS

DOH reports note state’s cardiac care quality

Sunday, October 21, 2012
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— Patients who received cardiac treatment in New York from 2008 to 2010 had low risk of death or complication, continuing the state’s hospitals trend of offering the “highest quality” of cardiac care, according to two state Department of Health reports released last week.

Since heart disease is the leading cause of death among New Yorkers, the reports are designed to improve overall care and help patients who are trying to decide on cardiovascular disease treatments or cardiac surgery.

“These reports highlight the excellent team of doctors and nurses dedicated to providing New Yorker’s with first-rate cardiac care,” said state Health Commissioner Nirav Shah in a news release.

Hospitals and doctors report to the state Health Department and the state Cardiac Advisory Committee, who analyze the risk factors for angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft surgery — the two most common procedures performed on heart disease patients.

Patients were observed for 30 days after treatment, including in the weeks following discharge.

Angioplasty is occasionally performed on an emergency basis, so comparison of mortality rates is best demonstrated using non-emergency cases only. The statewide risk-adjusted mortality rate was 0.55 for the three years beginning Jan. 1, 2008 and ending Dec. 31, 2010. Out of a total 162,918 people who received angioplasty during this time, 1,468 died.

Here’s how local hospitals compare:

St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany experienced 30 deaths out of a total 2,404 people who received angioplasty during the three-year period. Its risk-adjusted mortality rate using non-emergency cases was 1.01.

Albany Medical Center experienced 31 deaths out of a total 3,366 people who received angioplasty over the three-year period. Its risk-adjusted mortality rate using non-emergency cases was 0.94.

Ellis Hospital experienced 16 deaths out of a total 1,541 people who received angioplasty during the three-year period. Its risk-adjusted mortality rate using non-emergency cases was 0.44.

The second Department of Health report showed the outcomes for isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), heart valve surgery, and the two procedures done in combination.

Over the same three-year period, 525 people died within 30 days out of the overall 30,276 who received isolated CABG surgery at a New York hospital. Out of the 22,233 people who received valve or combined surgeries, 1,021 died. The statewide risk-adjusted mortality for all of the above was 2.94.

Here’s how local hospitals compare:

St. Peter’s Hospital experienced 15 deaths out of 1,175 isolated CABG surgeries and 33 deaths out of 861 valve or combined surgeries. Its risk-adjusted mortality rate for all three was 2.94.

Albany Medical Center experienced 13 deaths out of 896 isolated CABG surgeries and 18 deaths out of 443 valve or combined surgeries. It’s risk-adjusted mortality rate for all three was 2.86.

Ellis Hospital experienced 11 deaths out of 652 isolated CABG surgeries and eight deaths out of 325 valve or combined surgeries. Its risk-adjusted mortality rate for all three was 2.5.

Health officials touted a few highlights from the report.

The state’s mortality rate of angioplasty procedures dropped 0.91 percent from 2009 to 2010.

The statewide mortality rate for cardiac bypass surgery dropped even more, by 1.79 percent from 2009 to 2010.

Widening the comparison to three-year periods, the statewide mortality rate for valve and combined valve bypass surgeries dropped from 5.45 percent from 2005-2007 to 4.59 percent from 2008-2010.

 
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