CARS HOMES JOBS

Schenectady council candidates looking to empower community

Thursday, November 1, 2012
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— The crime rate and the unemployment rate have captured the attention of the two candidates running for one seat on the Schenectady City Council.

Councilwoman Marion Porterfield, the Democrat, is trying to address unemployment by connecting the jobless with training programs that get them to new jobs. Republican challenger Richard Patierne is planning ways to cut the crime rate if he’s elected, both by giving police more resources and convincing more crime witnesses to come forward.

Porterfield, who ran the Weed and Seed program before being appointed to the City Council this year, said she doesn’t consider herself a “true politician.”

Meet the candidates

Marion Porterfield

Age: 56

Ballot lines: Democrat, Working Families

Experience: Appointed to the City Council in 2012; former coordinator of Weed and Seed; trained in community economic development by NeighborWorks America

Education: Graduated from Linton High School; enrolled at SUNY-Empire State College, majoring in community and human services; city resident since elementary school

Richard Patierne

Age: 46

Ballot lines: Republican, Alliance, Conservative, Independence

Experience: Manages multimillion-dollar budget for Buildings Department at Union College, is a volunteer baseball and football coach, and has owned a house in Schenectady since age 21

Education: Graduated from Linton High School and Schenectady County Community College

“I bring the voice of the community to the table,” she said.

In her seven months on the council, she said she’s most proud of getting more residents involved in government.

Her campaign literature included council meeting dates and how to contact council members, and she encouraged residents to speak out on topics effecting them.

“I think that’s important,” she said. “People should know what’s happening as it happens, so they can give their input.”

In terms of finances, she supports consolidation of certain tasks with the county and other agencies as a way to reduce cost and improve efficiency.

She also wants to connect employers who need help and training agencies that can train residents to do those jobs. She would use her role as a council member to advertise those opportunities in an effort to help people find work, she said.

In many cases, she added, the problem isn’t a lack of jobs but a lack of training for the available jobs.

She’s also working on a plan to fund more small businesses in the city’s residential neighborhoods. She hopes to present it to the Metroplex Development Authority.

“It’s something that’s still developing. You have to have a plan,” she said.

If elected, she hopes to take on the role of liaison to community groups that are working to improve their neighborhoods. She wants to help them find grants to fund the projects and goals listed in the Schenectady 2020 plan.

Porterfield is very familiar with grants from her work with Weed and Seed, a federal program that gave communities grants to “weed out” crime and “seed” positive activities in its place. She ran Schenectady’s program, which worked to get organizations cooperating on initiatives.

However, the federal government decided not to renew Schenectady’s grant after Porterfield failed to file complete paperwork on time. Porterfield insisted she wasn’t to blame.

“It was one thing that happened. We saw it one way, and the federal government saw it another way, so they decided not to fund that particular grant,” she said.

Patierne is hoping to become the second non-Democrat on the City Council. He wants to vote for conservative finance measures along with independent Councilman Vince Riggi and the two Democrats who have generally supported those goals.

That means Patierne, a Republican, has a chance at creating a majority alliance on fiscal discipline — although the Democrats have already responded to the possibility by pushing council members to vote with the party rather than breaking ranks.

In addition to finance matters, Patierne wants to focus on reducing the city’s crime rate. He said he wants to work with police to find out what they need to make a significant cut in crime.

“I want them to have every single tool they need,” he said, adding that he would consider adding officers if the department isn’t “staffed properly.”

He also wants a paid tip line that is widely advertised. The city’s current tip line doesn’t pay tipsters and isn’t well-known.

“The residents have to be involved and they can’t be afraid to send in a tip,” he said. “That’s why we need a confidential tip line.”

He would ask businesses to fund rewards or pay for advertising.

“I’m sure they’d like to see a safer Schenectady, too,” he said.

As for improving the neighborhoods, he wants to focus on paving streets and adding streetlights on dark roads. He would ask the Metroplex Development Authority to fund some of that work.

He also criticized the City Council for holding a closed caucus meeting to discuss their changes to the 2013 budget on Monday. The Democrats — including Porterfield — kicked out Riggi in a legal maneuver and discussed the budget behind closed doors.

Patierne said that should never happen.

“I recognize it was legal, but …” Patierne said. “During probably the most critical budget decision that has to be made, the press isn’t allowed, the public isn’t allowed, and even one of their own councilmen isn’t allowed to be part of the discussion?”

He said he would push for greater openness.

“The transparency has to be there,” he said. “By having these open meetings and transparency, I think we can win back the trust of the people.”

 
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comments

November 1, 2012
2:15 a.m.

Porterfield could of done the right thing and voted No on this last budget proposal and also voted No on the County Sales Tax agreement that has cost this city. Another rubber stamp under the Boss Gardener Machine of politics in Schenectady.She could of walked out of these private meetings that kicked out Councilman Riggi who has no party affiliation and is in no opposition to her Democratic party machine. All of these council people should be ashamed of themselves with the evil and dishonest conduct they have shown themselves to be in a time of crisis. Brucker, King, Perazzo, Erikson and Porterfield..not an independent mind in the bunch to support the people they represent, just a rubber stamp for their party Boss...Boss Gardener and his Machine. Wake up people.

November 1, 2012
6:31 p.m.
tonijean613 says...

The last thing we need is to increase the police budget! They have all the high tech tools they need ! What is needed is for the police living outside of the city to return here to live. You will see the city improve overnight ! Union College already is given a free pass when it comes to their contribution to the city- Do we really need a candidate with a conflict of interest because he works full time for Union College? I dont think so. Union College needs to contribute more to the City. Not get more freebies.

November 2, 2012
6:54 a.m.

Conflict of interest?.....Ha..ha...ha....Perazzo...King, Brucker, McCarthy...all have worked for county and or still working for publicly funded entities...County....through SCCC, DA's office, or Proctors Theater.......Really? Conflicts of interest...come one...all working on the Public dime for most of if not all of their careers...All will receive Pensions through tax payer dollars....They have been getting a free pass most of their lives...

November 2, 2012
6:56 a.m.

The last thing we need is another RUBBER STAMP PUPPET doing Boss Gardener's bidding for the Machine...serving themselves and excluding the public whom they continually abuse and steal from....WAKE UP!!!!

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