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Schenectady deputy commended for how he handles the tough task of eviction

Williams present when people lose homes

Schenectady County sheriff's Deputy Donald Williams received the New York State Sheriff's Association Civil Deputy of the Year award.
Photographer: Marc Schultz
Schenectady County sheriff's Deputy Donald Williams received the New York State Sheriff's Association Civil Deputy of the Year award.
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Whenever Schenectady County residents are evicted, sheriff’s Deputy Donald Williams is present. Sometimes the residents are still sleeping and he tells them to get dressed. He pokes his head inside the closets to make sure nobody is hiding, and if the residents are upset, he tries to keep things calm. He has encountered pit bulls and uncovered puppy mills. He has evicted businesses whose employees didn’t even know they were about to lose their jobs. ...

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comments

ChuckD
February 5, 2012
11:44 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Wow, there's something to be proud of. Look at all the good he's doing.

(sarcasm)

mossey
February 6, 2012
7:15 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Wow, that was rude, Chuck. It's a necessary job, and I know I couldn't do it.

Mr. Williams' efforts keep our city from becoming a haven for squatters in a collection of abandoned buildings. No one is happy that these things must be done, but they must.

lsuriano
February 6, 2012
10:27 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Congratulations on your Award Don, and thank you very much for your professionalism. Keep up the good work and thanks again.

Lou Suriano
Integrity 1st Realty, LLC

ChuckD
February 6, 2012
10:42 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Sorry. I don't know Mr. Williams. I'm sure he's a good neighbor. If he is one, I'm sure he's a good father.

But there's something far more rude about this work being glorified in the newspaper. The city's not going to become a 'haven for squatters' any more than you're going to move into a walled community. How about stories about those social workers who are actually helping? How about stories about the beat cops active in community outreach in those places we don't like to think about?

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