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Robotics competition got students pointed in the right direction

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Robotics competition got students pointed in the right direction

Re the Dec. 9 Viewpoint, “Letting business shape K-12 curriculum is terrible idea” :

On Dec. 8, we had a rookie team that is going to participate in the first robotics competition visit for a full day at our shop, the Kell Robotics Innovation Center in Kennesaw, Ga.

They rode a school bus 200 miles one way to get there. They thought they were ...

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wmarincic
December 14, 2012
7:50 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Richard McMahan I don't care what they do in other countries this is America and unTechnically, *some* Americans have been keeping Christmas for as long as there's been an America, and even before. In fact, Columbus named the first settlement he founded in Cuba "Navidad" becasue they landed on Christmas Day.

Some of the first Americans, the Puritans (like the Thanksgiving Pilgrims) did *not* celebrate Christmas. They thought it was improper, and not appropriately Christian. It was not the "Christ's birth" part they had a problem with, but the revelry and feasting. But other newly settled Americans were less prudish ...

Really, though, Christmas became the big deal it is today in the 1800s, due mostly to the efforts of a few people in England and America, including Clement C. Moore (author of A Visit from St. Nicholas ). It first became popular in New York, where they tried to declare St. Nicholas the patron saint of the city; from there it spread, helped along by, amongst others, the Irish and the Germans. It was finally declared a national holiday in the 1870s
til the liberal takeover in the 70s this was not an issue. Also it seems that we are also hearing from the muslims that left there muslim states for America, we took them in, now it is time for them to assimilate to OUR culture. They may still celebrate and pray as they wish but that does not mean destroying our culture.

SnowGrinch
December 14, 2012
8:43 a.m.

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Of course we all know that Christ was NOT born on Dec 25th, but the early Christians needed a marketing ploy to attract new customers. Promoting the birth of Christ on the same day as the pagan celebration of the Winter Solstice helped gain new converts to their brand of religion.
The celebration predates Christ to the The Neolithic Era, where stone age people celebrated the Solstice, thousands of years before Christ. The Druids at Stonehenge, Beiwe Festival in Finland; Chawmos in Pakistan, Deygān, Maidyarem in Iran, Inti Raymi in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador, were all part of celebrating the Solstice.
Even today in America, much of what you see celebrated at Christmas has nothing to do with Christ. Lighted reindeer, Santa Clause and elves cover the lawns of America's homes... hardly a celebration of Christ.
I welcome all to celebrate the birth of Christ as well as the first day of Winter, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or Yule.
As Robert McMahan pointed out, " Christians do not own the season."

bostonredsoxfan
December 14, 2012
9:08 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

wmarincic- I would note that you have cited the siginificant influence of Irish and German immigrants in the development of American Christmas traditions, and yet you then call on more recent immigrants to assimilate to current American culture. If previous immigrants had simply assimilated, current practices would look quite different. How might those who felt that revelry and feasting were inappropriate have reacted to those who brought different traditions to our shores?
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Just as a note of interest, there is evidence to suggest that Moore was not the author of "A Visit from St. Nicholas," but that it was instead Major Henry Livingston, Jr. (http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poets/liv...)

wmarincic
December 14, 2012
10:29 a.m.

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boston, but the Irish and Germans did assimilate. Both of my grandparents are German, once I asked my grandfather why he never speaks the language that I would have liked to learn it, his response was, "we are Americans, we speak English".

It seems like all of the immigrants until late have assimmilated, yes you have your pockets of those who have not like Chinatown, but for the most they have. My issue is that if the country that some of these people came from with their laws and practices were so great, why did they leave? When we go to muslim countries, females must wear head coverings, we are not allowed to practice our freedoms there, yet they are free here and it seems that our freedom is not enough, they want to use our laws and freedom against us.

bostonredsoxfan
December 14, 2012
11:18 a.m.

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wmarinic- Ah, but that's a much larger issue than the nature of December holiday celebrations, and whether or not it is appropriate to refer to a decorated and lighted evergreen as a "holiday tree." I would also note that, as I'm sure you know, many Germans assimilated more quickly out of fear - like a colleague of mine whose father changed the family name from Schmidt to Smith in the 1930's to avoid backlash from anti-German sentiment. Back to the original issue, I believe that we must continue to allow for an evolution of cultural traditions, as you have clearly shown has long been the case.

Newsworthy
December 14, 2012
11:24 p.m.

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While the historical information is interesting, the point I see in the original letter by Arlene Shako is that the Schenectady parade was, for years, a Christmas parade held on Thanksgiving week end. Now, to (seemingly) accommodate downtown merchants, the parade has been moved to an earlier date. At the same time, it's been re-named a "holiday" parade to be politically correct and avoid offending any non-Chrisitians.

I don't think anyone has a right to be offended by it being a Christmas parade. Other religions can stage parades to celebrate their holidays. The real issues here are that Christians are being told to be quiet about their beliefs and that financial gain of a favored few is more important than tradition (there's a surprise!).

For years, we had a family tradition of going to the Schenectady Christmas parade. Now, we boycott the parade because it's been prostituted. It doesn't fit a rational model of social evolution. Freuliche Weinachten! (Merry Christmas, auf Deutsch).

bostonredsoxfan
December 17, 2012
6:14 a.m.

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There is nothing Christian about celebrating Christmas with a parade (especially in November, when it's not even Advent yet to say nothing about Christmas). As a Christian, I was offended when it was called a Christmas parade and included military units and politicians.

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