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Tree-killing insect found in Schenectady yard

Experts: Hemlock woolly adelgid easy to get under control

Hemlock needles have two white lines on the undersides. The hemlock woolly adelgid can be difficult to spot because of its tiny size, but the cottony egg mass is the main indication you should look for on needles, according to officials. An electron microscope image of the insect is shown inset. (DEC, USDA photos)
Hemlock needles have two white lines on the undersides. The hemlock woolly adelgid can be difficult to spot because of its tiny size, but the cottony egg mass is the main indication you should look for on needles, according to officials. An electron microscope image of the insect is shown inset. (DEC, USDA photos)
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An invasive insect that feeds on hemlock trees has been discovered for the first time in Schenectady County. The state Department of Environmental Conservation confirmed Tuesday that a hemlock woolly adelgid infestation was located in the yard of a home in the city of Schenectady on Aug. 20. The tiny insect, which comes from East Asia, attacks forest and ornamental hemlock trees and can cause widespread damage. First discovered in New York state in 1985, ...


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