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New SCCC dorm expected to draw more students

Aviation program able to grow with housing

Denise Murphy McGraw, chairwoman of the Board of Trustees of Schenectady County Community College, and college President Quintin B. Bullock look over the living room/kitchen area of a demo suite in the college's student housing project that opened for tours Thursday.
Photographer: Marc Schultz
Denise Murphy McGraw, chairwoman of the Board of Trustees of Schenectady County Community College, and college President Quintin B. Bullock look over the living room/kitchen area of a demo suite in the college's student housing project that opened for tours Thursday.
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Schenectady County Community College officials hope applications will soar with construction of new student housing across the street. Aviation students are expected to be a big component of the new 264-bed College Suites at Washington Square dormitory being constructed at 117 Washington Ave. There are about 70 students in the aviation and air traffic control program currently, according to Barbara Jones, associate professor and liaison for aviation in the Division of Mathematics, Science Technology and ...

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comments

dagiacalone
April 6, 2012
8:27 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

No amount of median and other "improvements" will solve the problem of SCCC students constantly crossing Washington Ave. to get to and from the college to the dorm. That stretch of Washington Ave. is not a downtown street, it is a highly congested and busy exit and entry ramp for I-890, and the reality of SCCC jaywalkers should worry all of us who have to travel between State St. and I-890, and all of us who care about the safety of the students. Whether doing so obliviously or defiantly, students will be jaywalking across the exit ramp night and day in good weather and bad, weaving between large and small vehicles backed up at the State St. traffic light or dodging the vehicles traveling at high speed on the ramp.

It is difficult to image how "widening the median to improve safety and accessibility" will do much more than encourage more jaywalking. A tall fence separating the northbound and southbound lanes of the exit ramp, from the crosswalk at State St./Rt. 5 to I-890 might be the only way to discourage the reckless pedestrians.

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