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From early times to now, Schenectady welcomes immigrants

Larry Scorzella, right, and Tony Cristello, center, pick up four buckets of lemon ice for Mount Carmel Church from Roie Angerami, left, at Civitello's on North Jay Street in Schenectady.
Photographer: Patrick Dodson
Larry Scorzella, right, and Tony Cristello, center, pick up four buckets of lemon ice for Mount Carmel Church from Roie Angerami, left, at Civitello's on North Jay Street in Schenectady.
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Schenectady’s Dutch settlers weren’t interested in establishing an exclusive community. The city’s first inhabitants were traders and were more focused on finding others to exchange goods with than worrying about foreign influences. The Dutch were more prone to tolerance than their English counterparts in New England, where settlements were often founded by religious refugees and remained largely homogeneous. “The Dutch were traders,” said Don Rittner, the Schenectady County historian. “They wanted friends. They wanted treaties.” ...


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