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Letters to the Editors for April 30

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Exploiting natural resources is what got us into this mess In Stephen Williams’ April 23 column, “Gibson may be right about need for power,” Rep. Chris Gibson is quoted as saying, “I want to see us exploit all the possibilities.” This may be the thinking most responsible for the gigantic environmental crisis we are living in. We have exploited everything to the maximum, leading to a very depleted, polluted and horrendously mutilated planet. We have ...


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wmarincic
April 30, 2011
8:59 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Michael Winn I wonder why it took 3 years and several million dollars before he did. Maybe it was the Polls the White House saw that said that 68% of people wonder about his birth... Much more than your 5%..... Also Wall St. was brought on by your Liberal buddies Bill Clinton and Barney Frank.... You can not change reality.... BTW Dr. Michael Savage says Liberalism is a mental disorder. I Agree.........

WordWiz78
April 30, 2011
3:06 p.m.

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interesting...somehow the letters in the online version of today's Gazette are completely different letters than those in the printed version. Which is a shame, because I want to reply to one from the printed version. Well, I guess I'll re-type the text of Mr. Edmond Day's letter: "What hospice does, and doesn't, tell you."

"Hospice is the flip side of the 'death panel' coin. Hospice is 'day care' for the elderly and terminally ill. The people too busy to bring up their children now understand that what goes around comes around. The children are too busy to care for their elderly.

Hospice has a place in the health care network, but it is taking on a 'life' of its own. The mantra of hospice is, 'you are going to die.' Clients are told this flat out. Families do not have the guts to deal with death, so they have strangers do their dirty work. Where responsible family members do not exist, hospice has its place.

Having functioned as primary health provider (the person who does the dirty work) and power of attorney for the elderly in my family, no one - not me for sure - ever told a sick person, 'you are going to die.'

Many hospice personnel have an air of authority about themselves. It is a natural high to some, declaring when another is to die.

Hospice is another road to hell paved with good intentions."

That's Mr. Day's letter. Since there's a word limit to responses, I'll put my response in a separate comment.

[cont.]

WordWiz78
April 30, 2011
3:20 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

[cont.]

Ok, my response:

Mr. Day, in spite of your incredibly high opinion of yourself, the only thing you've managed to successfully illustrate here is that you know how to make a lot of inflammatory accusations without feeling the need for any pesky facts to back them up.

Seeing as you yourself make the claim to be the person who functioned as primary caregiver, I'm not real clear where your interaction with Hospice lies that gives you such a "perfect" understanding of what it is. Here is what I do know.

Hospice is intended as an aide for terminal patients, as well as their families, so that the person may pass in their own home, a family member's home, or at least a "home-like" environment, as opposed to a hospital or nursing facility. The families are encouraged to take part in day-to-day activities with their family member. I'm sure more people would like to be able to stay 24/7 with their dying relative, and attend to their needs themselves, but seeing as few of us are a combination of Aristotle Onassis and Dr. Quinn, we have neither the financial capability nor the medical know-how to do so without assistance.

Every patient I have encountered (and there have been a lot) who is being placed in Hospice understands that Hospice is not someplace they are going so that they may get better. They are aware that they are dying, or at least - in the instances in which the patient has a mind-crippling illness - the family is aware of this. I suppose, though, you feel it would be better to just make-believe life is all puppies and rainbows rather than acknowledge reality, while simultaneously trying to make the person as content and comfortable as possible.

How dare you to assume that families don't have "the guts" to face death! Losing a family member is difficult, as is the knowledge that it is going to happen. Needing help coping with this fact, and requesting that help, is not the equivalent of cowardice, any more than a suicidal person seeking psychological help is. It's recognizing our emotional limits.

Amongst all the good Hospice providers, there are sure to be some with a poor attitude, just like any other field. Your letter, Mr. Day, is clear proof that these few Hospice providers hardly have a monopoly on arrogance, though!

wmarincic
April 30, 2011
8:03 p.m.

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Wordwiz78 again we agree. When my grandmother who raised me was about to die of congestive heart failure in 2003 Hospice was a Godsend. My grandmother lived in Watertown about 3 hours away, the rest of my family for the most part live here. My wife quit her job and drove to Watertown on Sunday afternoon to relieve me who left Schenectady Thursday after work at 5 and drove to Watertown. My niece drove from Albany on Friday night after work at 5 to relieve me.

Now, thanks to Hospice they were able to give direction and guidance. They were all very caring and showed a great respect for my grandmother who passed away at 95 years of age. They helped us understand the medication and if we had questions or needed help they were there. They came two times a day for an hour or so to give us a nuch needed break. It sounds like Mr Day is confused about Hospice's role. They are not a 24 hour caregiver but a shoulder to cry on if needed and a experienced and caring organization that has been nothing but great.

wmarincic
April 30, 2011
8:04 p.m.

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BTW they came every day for the 6 weeks that she was home amongst her family and loved ones.

smith
May 1, 2011
5:46 p.m.

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Well, Sheer might not have dotted every "I" in a column restricted to about 600 words, but Sheffer's sophism would be funnier than the comic pages if so much weren't at stake. Typical corporate prevarications.

ljordan
May 3, 2011
7:20 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Terri Roben writes a great letter. Common sense dictates that the most effective way to get more energy is to use what one has more efficiently. It's a low cost, low impact solution that surprisingly gets little play. Well done Terri!

Larry Jordan

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