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Seeing the unseen

Father and son mummies reunited in exhibit that explores the study of ancient preserved remains

The mummy of Pahat, one of Berkshire Museum’s earliest acquisitions, has been on continuous view since 1903. At left is Pahat as he lies in the museum, unwrapped — although sustaining a little damage — for 2,300 years. At right is a CT scan of the mummy, revealing details and information without the further damage of unwrapping. (Images courtesy of the Berkshire Museum)
The mummy of Pahat, one of Berkshire Museum’s earliest acquisitions, has been on continuous view since 1903. At left is Pahat as he lies in the museum, unwrapped — although sustaining a little damage — for 2,300 years. At right is a CT scan of the mummy, revealing details and information without the further damage of unwrapping. (Images courtesy of the Berkshire Museum)
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“Are they real?” Maybe it’s because of Wii and 3D, but when visitors to the Berkshire Museum see the three mummies, some of them just can’t believe the human remains are more than 2,000 years old, museum staffers say. Skulls and bones. The pulp of a tooth. Blackened toes that peek out from layers of ancient, resin-imbedded cloth. Seated in front of a video screen, we can peer deep inside a body cavity at severed ...


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