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Arrest made after Shen data breach

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A 10th-grader at Shenendehowa Central School has been charged with three crimes for allegedly accessing personnel files on a school computer Tuesday. State Police said the boy, who is not being identified because of his age, is charged with computer trespass, unlawful possession of personal identification information and identity theft. The 15-year-old is accused of looking at the files of bus drivers as he worked on a school-owned computer in a classroom. District spokeswoman Kelly ...


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comments

rholtzjr
October 28, 2008
7:10 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Let the kids go... FIRE the network administrator!!!!
This is nothing more that showing that the educators in our school system are IDIOTS, and this is the only means they have to respond! By ruining a child's life!!!! GET REAL..... HIRE A REAL NETWORK SECURITY OFFICIAL AND STOP HIRING H1B's to secure your network!!!!

PLEASE~~~~

rholtzjr
October 28, 2008
7:18 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

[ Suggest removal ]
rholtzjr ( no real name given ) says...

Let the kids go... FIRE the network administrator!!!!
[Suggest removal] "This is nothing more that showing that the educators in our school system are IDIOTS, and this is the only means they have to respond! By ruining a child's life!!!! GET REAL..... HIRE A REAL NETWORK SECURITY OFFICIAL AND STOP HIRING H1B's to secure your network!!!!

PLEASE~~~~"

WTF!!!!! SUGGEST REMOVAL!!!!!

mikelieman
October 28, 2008
7:26 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

It's sad that the School District is making a scapegoat out of a student when the real culprits are the School District's incompetent staff and employees in the first place.

SHAME ON YOU!

I wonder how much of the District's money is going to be wasted defending against the student's civil litigation?

rholtzjr
October 28, 2008
7:28 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Are you a REAL reporting agency in the United States of America?. You actually give the ability for other people to selectively remove comments from your forum?

mrobarge
October 28, 2008
8:18 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

Read the link again. It says "SUGGEST removal." The final decision to remove a comment is made ONLY by network administrators and ONLY if the comment violates the Web site's Terms of Service.

rwheeler
October 28, 2008
9:50 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

I think someones pride was hurt in this. This is something that I do on a regular basis. A friend will as me before purchasing something on the net "Do you think this is a safe site to purchase from?" I will then go do my own battery of test to see if it is. If I find something I alert the site administrators to fix it. Case in point a site by the of "yoonew.com" (The issue has been fixed) had a RFI problem that allowed an attacker to view files on the local machine that was hosting it. So I called the site owner on his home phone and gave him his address, his ssn, and his bank account info. He could have easily said he wanted to press charges... but he was thankful that I called to alert him of the misconfiguration. Now I agree charge the kid if he had malicious intent... but if he alerted someone that had authority to make a decision on getting it fixed then I think this case will not make it far. As for the School District and the County they will be spending more money to try this case than to hire some one to fix the problem... just another case of someone placing there pride before good judgment... this is why our country is in shambles now!!!!

kingthorin
October 28, 2008
12:53 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

@rwheeler
"This is something that I do on a regular basis. A friend will as me before purchasing something on the net "Do you think this is a safe site to purchase from?" I will then go do my own battery of test to see if it is."

So you admit on a public forum that you break the law on a regular basis....nice!

"Now I agree charge the kid if he had malicious intent... but if he alerted someone that had authority to make a decision on getting it fixed then I think this case will not make it far."

If there was no malicious intent or he didn't know he was doing anything wrong why did he report it anonymously? Why not just walk down to the office and show the principal first hand what he'd found?

In both the case of the boy(s) and yourself "malicious intent" is irrelevant as the law currently sits.

What if I just use a slimjim on your car and take it for a joy ride then send you an anonymous email saying I borrowed it for a while, I just wanted to prove that your locks were insufficient to secure your car, I'm sure you wouldn't mind.

rox0r
October 28, 2008
4:18 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

>>>>>
What if I just use a slimjim on your car and take it for a joy ride then send you an anonymous email saying I borrowed it for a while, I just wanted to prove that your locks were insufficient to secure your car, I'm sure you wouldn't mind.
<<<<<<

Since you like car analogies here is one you can understand. Suppose your car door was unlocked, hanging open, and the car was coasting towards a cliff with a baby in the back. I'm sure you wouldn't mind me jumping in and stopping the car long enough to put the emergency brake on and then notifying you. Even if i notified you anonymously because i didn't want to get slapped with kidnapping your baby.

coptercoy
October 28, 2008
4:26 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

1. McAfee provides this type of intrusion test as a service so there is clearly some question as to if the test and detection of a security flaw is in fact the digital equivalent of 'breaking and entering'.

2. As to the 'walk down the hall' comment, you might as well question the suitability of police anonymous tip lines. It is self evident.

3. A more proper 'grand theft auto' analogy could likely be this:
The kid clearly see the keys to the school bus hanging from your the underside of the bus' bumper. For some reason they might think that is secure...after all, who would look for keys hanging off of a bumper. He picks up the keys, knocks on the door, dangles them in front of principle in immature jab about how its not secure to leave your keys hanging from the bumper, drops them on the ground, and walks away laughing softly.

Then they proceed to sue him for theft of the keys.

Fire the bus driver who thought it was a good idea to store the keys hanging from the bumper. Scold the kid for being a smart ***.

agreatplacetoraiseyourkids
October 29, 2008
11:19 a.m.

[ Flag Post ]

This is absurd. The kid is being charged with a federal offense, which is tantamount to terrorism under the Patriot Act. Detention for sassing off to the principle sounds a much more fitting punishment than the fines and jail time associated with the alleged crimes, especially considering that the kid could probably be tried as an adult.
If the school continues to prosecute then I propose a lawsuit against the school for violating obscenity laws. Or perhaps a charge as classic as "being of morally and ethically bankrupt character".

kingthorin
October 29, 2008
2:46 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

rox0r your example is broken for many reasons. My point was people get bent out of shape when what's used/stolen is a physical possession but they seem more than willing to forgive if it's data (especially if [as in this case] it's not their data).

kingthorin
October 29, 2008
2:47 p.m.

[ Flag Post ]

DOH...I missed part.

Also if you've done nothing wrong you wouldn't feel the need to report anonymously. (Whether it's data or a car/child).

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